Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site

  General Advisory 07/19/18
Campfires and open flames prohibited in all state park properties including campgrounds, day-use areas, and all areas of the Ocean Shore and beaches managed by OPRD. The fire ban applies to wood, charcoal, and other flame sources that cannot be turned off with a valve. Liquid fuel stoves or cooking devices that can be turned off with a valve are permitted, but cannot be left unattended. Visitors planning a trip to a state park should check for up-to-date information about fire restrictions by calling the state parks info line at 800-551-6949.

Major Features & Activities

  • Blue Indicates that some, but not all, facilities are accessible according to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards
Major Features & Activities:
  • Exhibit Information (ADA)

If you haven’t seen this place, you need to go.  Originally a Chinese medical clinic, general store, community center and residence, Kam Wah Chung gives you an incomparable glimpse into the past. This remarkable site, a National Historic Landmark, is located in the town of John Day, and includes a museum and a separate interpretive center.

The museum was built in the 1870s, possibly as a trading post.  This tiny, unassuming building became home to two Chinese immigrants, Ing “Doc” Hay and Lung On.  Both became locally famous:  Lung On as a general store proprietor and businessman, and “Doc” Hay as a practitioner of herbal medicine.  For 50-some years, the building was a social, medical and religious center for the Oregon’s Chinese community.

Learn more about Kam Wah Chung by watching an Emmy nominated documentary produced by Oregon Public broadcasting.

An ADA-accessible interpretive center across the street from the museum is open daily.  In 2011, the center opened a new exhibit, detailing the life and times of Doc Hay and Lung On.

Museum Tours

Open daily May 1 - October 31, 9 a.m. - Noon, 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Guided tours only. Tours start at the top of each hour at the Interpretive Center and last about 45 minutes (last tour at 4 p.m.).  Free tickets for the tour can be picked up at the Interpretive Center.