2017 Solar Eclipse

The Aug. 21, 2017 solar eclipse begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 11:30 a.m. (Pacific Daylight Time). The 60-mile wide path of totality—when the moon completely blocks the sun—will last for about two minutes starting at 10:15 a.m. on the Oregon coast between Newport and Lincoln City. The path of totality then sweeps through Oregon and on to Idaho, then races across the United States toward South Carolina.

How do I reserve a campsite in the totality path?

Campgrounds in the path of totality are full. Some campsites near the path are still available. See Which campgrounds are close to the totality path? on this page below the map and totality park list.

Feb. 14. 2017 Note: We are making plans to temporarily convert first-come, first-served state park campgrounds to reservation-only for the eclipse weekend. We are also creating additional special event camping at some parks. We expect several hundred additional campsites to be made available for reservation this spring. Keep checking this website and follow us on Facebook to stay updated.

Which campgrounds are in the totality path?

Our map below shows the campgrounds in the totality path. Click on a camping symbol to see the park name and a link to the park web page or see the park list below. Round camping symbols indicate that some, but not all, facilities are accessible according to Americans with Disabilities Act standards.

The campgrounds listed have a combination of campsites (tent and recreational vehicles), cabins and yurts. Please read the information about each park and make sure the location meets your viewing needs. Some parks have tall trees, hills and limited access to a full view of the sky. Camping is allowed only in designated campsites.

Please see our Find A Park web page for other nearby state parks and campgrounds.

Note: OPRD is making plans to temporarily convert first-come, first-served state park campgrounds to reservation-only for the eclipse, so additional campsites will be made available at a later date.

All park locations and the totality path are approximate.

Coastal campgrounds

FULL Devil's Lake State Recreation Area
FULL Beverly Beach State Park
FULL South Beach State Park

Willamette Valley campgrounds

Willamette Mission State Park (not yet available; additional information coming soon)

Cascade Mountain foothills (far east Willamette Valley)

FULL Silver Falls State Park
FULL Detroit Lake State Recreation Area
North Santiam State Recreation Area (not yet available; additional information coming soon.)
Cascadia State Park (not yet available; additional information coming soon. )

Central Oregon (east of the Cascades)

FULL The Cove Palisades State Park
Smith Rock State Park (not yet available; additional information coming soon)

Eastern Oregon

Clyde Holliday State Recreation Site (not yet available; additional information coming soon. )
Bates State Park (not yet available; additional information coming soon)
Unity Lake State Recreation Site (not yet available; additional information coming soon.)
FULL Farewell Bend State Recreation Area

Which campgrounds are close to the totality path?

Transportation officials predict traffic will be at a standstill on Aug. 21. Keep in mind that it may be impossible to drive into the path of totality that morning. But if you’re less than 30 miles from the path of totality, you’ll see what’s called “deep partiality.” You’ll see the chromosphere – a thin band of deep, beautiful red hugging the sun. The sky darken, and everything around you will seem sharper and clearer.

The following parks are within 15 miles of the totality path.

Coast
FULL Beachside
FULL Cape Lookout
YURTS FULL Carl G. Washburne (not yet available; information coming soon.)

Willamette Valley
FULL Champoeg
FULL Milo McIver

Central Oregon (east of the Cascades)
FULL Prineville Reservoir and Jasper Point (not yet available; information coming soon.)
FULL Tumalo

Eastern Oregon
Catherine Creek
(not yet available; information coming soon.)
Ukiah-Dale (not yet available; information coming soon.)

The following parks are 15-30 miles from the path of totality.

Coast
FULL Nehalem Bay

Jessie M. Honeyman (Reservations available.)

Portland area and Gorge
FULL
Ainsworth
FULL Deschutes River
L.L. Stub Stewart (Reservations available)
Memaloose (Reservations available)
Viento (Reservations available)

South Willamette Valley
Fall Creek (not yet available; information coming soon.)

Central Oregon
FULL LaPine

Eastern Oregon
Cottonwood Canyon
(not yet available; information coming soon.)
Hilgard Junction (not yet available; information coming soon.)

FULL Lake Owyhee
Red Bridge (not yet available; information coming soon.)
Succor Creek (not yet available; information coming soon.)
Wallowa Lake (Reservations available)

Other camping and lodging options
Check federal and county parks in the Path of Totality. Try for a campground in the Willamette National Forest in the Cascades, or the Ochoco, Umatilla or Malheur National Forests in eastern Oregon. Reservations open for most U.S. Forest Service campgrounds six months in advance.

Travel Salem has a list of Salem area lodging and camping options.

Linn County Parks (on the southern edge of the path)

What else do I need to know?

General park information is available by calling the Oregon State Parks information line, 800-551-6949.

State Capitol State Park

Although camping isn't allowed in State Capitol State Park, many eclipse activities are set for Aug. 19-21 in the State Capitol and the park grounds. For more information, visit Travel Salem

Eclipse resources

(links leave the www.oregonstateparks.org website and open in a new window)

Oregon eclipse events – Travel Oregon
Interactive Google map and solar eclipse path -- NASA
Eclipse times for cities in Oregon -- http://nationaleclipse.com/cities.htm
Path through Oregon -- eclipse2017.org
Oregon communities within the path -- eclipse2017.org
Two dozen tips for the eclipse -- Astronomy Magazine
Educational resource from Astronomical Society of the Pacific – astrosociety.org/uitc
 

The Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017 - fly along with the shadow! from Eclipse2017.org on Vimeo.