Memaloose State Park

Park History

The original park tract was 2.64 acres given to the state in 1925 by Roy D. and Bernice M. Chatfield. Situated on what was originally the old Columbia River Highway, the park was called Memaloose Island Overlook. With the reconstruction of the highway, additional private lands were purchased in 1952 and 1953. Land not needed for highway purposes was transferred to the Parks and Recreation Division. The park is named for a nearby island in the Columbia River which was a traditional Indian burial ground. In Chinook language, the word "memaloose" is associated with burial ritual. The most prominent feature on the island is a monument to Victor Trevitt, settler of The Dalles and friend of the Indians who died in 1883 and was buried on Memaloose Island in accordance with his wishes.

Acreage: 441.35

Annual overnight attendance: 42,210


Memaloose State Park FAQ

General

Did you know in 2012 our park participated in cusotmer surveys?

According to a 2012 survey of park visitors:

89% of our customers describe being "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with their overall experience at Memaloose State Park.

75% of our customers reported that they were either "very likely" or "likely" to return to Memaloose State Park in the future.

One customer commented, "We had a very good time at Memaloose State Park. We went to Memaloose State Park after spending a month on the road. We stayed in several campgrounds in California, which do not get even close to what was offered to us in Oregon. Not only at Memaloose, but in every campground visited within the State. Congratulations for the world class camping experience provided. We are now back in Brazil, but we will definitely come back to visit in the future. Once again we had a wonderful time. Thanks."

How do I get to Memaloose?

Memaloose is located in directly off I-84 in Mosier Oregon  97040.  There is no physical address for the park.

To get there:

Westbound I-84 get off on exit 73, go through the rest stop and the park is just west of the rest stop.

Eastbound I-84, get off at exit 76, and turn around to go westbound on I-84 and get off at exit 73 and follow the instructions above.

About Camping

When is the campground closed?

Campground is closed November 1 through Mid March

When is the campground open?

The campground is open mid March through October 31

What's Allowed

Can I fly my drone in the park?

UAS IN STATE PARKS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

UAS shall be limited and/or prohibited in Oregon State Parks in the Columbia River Gorge by reason of the following:
1. Interfere with other, established forms of recreation.
2. Endanger a natural or cultural resource.  (This includes disturbance of sensitive wildlife.)
3. Pose a risk to people or property.

ALLOWED PROPERTIES when following UAS GUIDELINES

Visitors following these UAS Guidelines are allowed to fly UAS in the following Oregon State Park properties in the Columbia River Gorge:
• George W. Joseph State Natural Area
• Dalton Point State Recreation Site
• Mitchell Point (Wygant State Natural Area, Vinzenz Lausman Memorial State Natural Area, Seneca Fouts Memorial State Natural Area)
• Mayer State Park (East, West, and Middle)
• Post Canyon (Wygant State Natural Area, Vinzenz Lausman Memorial State Natural Area, Seneca Fouts Memorial State Natural Area)

UAS are allowed seasonally, between October 1 and May 31, in the following Oregon State Park properties:
• Dabney State Recreation Area
• Rooster Rock State Park (ALLOWED ONLY WEST of the main office restroom)
• Benson State Recreation Area

PROHIBITED PROPERTIES

UAS are prohibited in the following Oregon State Park properties in the Columbia River Gorge:
• Rocky Butte State Scenic Corridor
• Lewis and Clark State Recreation Site
• Portland Women's Forum State Scenic Viewpoint
• Crown Point State Scenic Corridor
• Rooster Rock State Park (PROHIBITED EAST of the main office restroom, allowed seasonally WEST)
• Lower Latourell Falls (Guy W. Talbot State Park)
• Shepperd's Dell State Natural Area
• Bridal Veil Falls State Scenic Viewpoint
• Angel's Rest Trailhead
• Ainsworth State Park
• Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail (Including:  John B. Yeon State Scenic Corridor, Bonneville State Scenic Corridor, Toothrock Trailhead, Bridge of the Gods Trailhead, Hatfield West Trailhead, and Hatfield East Trailhead)
• Wyeth State Recreation Area (Undeveloped)
• Starvation Creek State Park
• Viento State Park
• Koberg Beach State Recreation Site
• Memaloose State Park
• Memaloose Overlook
• Rowena Crest

UAS are prohibited between June 1 and September 30 in the following properties:
• Dabney State Recreation Area
• Rooster Rock State Park (All areas)
• Benson State Recreation Area

SPECIAL USE PERMITS

UAS may be authorized in “Prohibited” Oregon State Park properties under agreed upon conditions, with a valid Special Use Permit signed by the park manager.  14 days of notice are required.  Special Use Permits may be considered for reasons such as scientific research, natural or cultural resource mapping, search and rescue, marketing, facility inspections, and/or similar activities.

SPECIAL USE PERMITS FOR FLYING UAS
  Request permits at the following locations:
Rooster Rock State Park Office, 503-695-2261
Viento State Park Office, 541-374-8811

Once permitted, please follow the “Columbia River Gorge Oregon State Parks:  UAS Guidelines” stated below and carry your Special Use Permit on you when flying your drone in parks.

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE OREGON STATE PARKS:  UAS GUIDELINES

Know Where to Fly
• UAS may only be flown in areas and during dates listed as “Allowed” in the “UAS in Oregon State Parks, Columbia River Gorge:  Park Listing and Guidelines” and with a signed Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Guidelines.
• UAS must be flown away from any structures, trees, or overhead obstacles.
• Flying must comply with all FAA regulations and guidance.  http://www.faa.gov/uas/
Protecting Wildlife and the Environment
• Do not fly over or near wildlife.  Intentionally disturbing animals during breeding, nesting, rearing, or other critical life functions is not allowed.
Fly Safely, Stay in Control
• Keep your UAS in your sight at all times.
• Keep your UAS away from populated and noise-sensitive areas such as campgrounds, trailheads, and visitor centers.
• Remain 25 feet away from individuals and vulnerable property including but not limited to parking lots, trail heads, restrooms, picnic shelters, park offices, park shop yards, park utility buildings, and heavily traveled roadways.
• Do not interfere with other recreational users; yield to people who were there before you.
• Obey all privacy laws.

Following these guidelines does not transfer liability or responsibility for safe UAS operations from you as the UAS owner to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department or the State of Oregon.  The immunities provided by ORS 105


Statewide FAQ

Available via this link